Subsidence of ash-flow calderas : relation to caldera size and magma-chamber geometry

@inproceedings{Lipman1997SubsidenceOA,
  title={Subsidence of ash-flow calderas : relation to caldera size and magma-chamber geometry},
  author={Lipman},
  year={1997}
}
Peter W. Lipman U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA e-mail: plipman@mojave.wr.usgs.gov Abstract Diverse subsidence geometries and collapse processes for ash-flow calderas are inferred to reflect varying sizes, roof geometries, and depths of the source magma chambers, in combination with prior volcanic and regional tectonic influences. Based largely on a review of features at eroded pre-Quaternary calderas, a continuum of geometries and subsidence styles is… CONTINUE READING
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