Subsea permafrost carbon stocks and climate change sensitivity estimated by expert assessment

@article{Sayedi2020SubseaPC,
  title={Subsea permafrost carbon stocks and climate change sensitivity estimated by expert assessment},
  author={Sayedeh Sara Sayedi and Benjamin W. Abbott and Brett F. Thornton and Jennifer M. Frederick and Jorien E. Vonk and Paul P. Overduin and Christina Sch{\"a}del and Edward. A.G. Schuur and Annie Bourbonnais and Nikita Demidov and Anatoly Gavrilov and Shengping He and Gustaf Hugelius and Martin Jakobsson and Miriam C. Jones and D. J. Joung and Gleb Kraev and R. Macdonald and A. David McGuire and Cuicui Mu and Matthew O’Regan and Kathryn M. Schreiner and Christian Stranne and Elena Pizhankova and Alexander A. Vasiliev and Sebastian Westermann and Jay P. Zarnetske and Tingjun Zhang and Mehran Ghandehari and Sarah Baeumler and Brian Christopher Brown and Rebecca J Frei},
  journal={Environmental Research Letters},
  year={2020},
  volume={15}
}
The continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas contain large stocks of organic matter (OM) and methane (CH4), representing a potential ecosystem feedback to climate change not included in international climate agreements. We performed a structured expert assessment with 25 permafrost researchers to combine quantitative estimates of the stocks and sensitivity of organic carbon in the subsea permafrost domain (i.e. unglaciated portions of the continental shelves exposed during… 

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