Subprocesses of Performance Monitoring: A Dissociation of Error Processing and Response Competition Revealed by Event-Related fMRI and ERPs

@article{Ullsperger2001SubprocessesOP,
  title={Subprocesses of Performance Monitoring: A Dissociation of Error Processing and Response Competition Revealed by Event-Related fMRI and ERPs},
  author={M. Ullsperger and D. V. Cramon},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2001},
  volume={14},
  pages={1387-1401}
}
Performance monitoring can be implemented in the brain by two possible systems, one monitoring for response competition or one detecting errors. Two current models of performance monitoring have different views on these monitoring subsystems. While the error detection model proposes a specific error detection system, the response competition model denies the necessity of a specific error detector and favors a more general unitary system evaluating response conflict. Both models suggest that the… Expand
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  • D. Swick, A. Turken
  • Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2002
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