Subjective and Objective Hierarchies and Their Relations to Psychological Well-Being: A U.S/Japan Comparison.

@article{Curhan2014SubjectiveAO,
  title={Subjective and Objective Hierarchies and Their Relations to Psychological Well-Being: A U.S/Japan Comparison.},
  author={Katherine B. Curhan and Cynthia S. Levine and Hazel Rose Markus and Shinobu Kitayama and Jiyoung Park and Mayumi Karasawa and Norito Kawakami and Gayle Dienberg Love and C. L. Coe and Yuri Miyamoto and Carol D. Ryff},
  journal={Social psychological and personality science},
  year={2014},
  volume={5 8},
  pages={855-864}
}
Hierarchy can be conceptualized as objective social status (e.g., education level) or subjective social status (i.e., one's own judgment of one's status). Both forms predict well-being. This is the first investigation of the relative strength of these hierarchy-well-being relationships in the U.S. and Japan, cultural contexts with different normative ideas about how social status is understood and conferred. In probability samples of Japanese (N=1027) and U.S. (N=1805) adults, subjective social… CONTINUE READING