Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Xylohypha emmonsii

@article{Padhye1988SubcutaneousPC,
  title={Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Xylohypha emmonsii},
  author={Arvind A. Padhye and W B Helwig and N G Warren and Libero Ajello and Francis W. Chandler and Michael R. Mcginnis},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Microbiology},
  year={1988},
  volume={26},
  pages={709 - 712}
}
The first human phaeohyphomycotic infection caused by Xylohypha emmonsii is described. The patient, an 83-year-old woman, developed a purpuric lesion on her left arm. The pale brown fungal elements observed in biopsy tissue consisted of thin- to thick-walled, oval to spherical, yeastlike cells with single and, occasionally, multiple buds; chains of budding cells; cells with internal septations in one and, rarely, two planes; and septate hyphae. In culture, X. emmonsii grew moderately fast at 25… 
Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Cladophialophora bantiana.
TLDR
A 32-year-old African American woman with systemic lupus erythematosus presented with a 2-year history of multiple, recurrent, tender, and ulcerated skin nodules with purulent drainage on her upper back, and histologic sections of the excision demonstrated features of phaeohyphomycosis.
Cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Cladophialophora bantiana.
Xylohypha emmonsii sp. nov., a new agent of phaeohyphomycosis
TLDR
Xylohypha emmonsii Padhye, McGinnis et Ajello is described as a new dematiaceous opportunistic pathogen of humans and lower animals and by the development of short chains of asymmetrically bent to ellipsoid blastoconidia.
Case Report. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Cladosporium cladosporioides
TLDR
The present report constitutes the first record of cutaneous or subcutaneous infection due to Cl. cladosporioides from India.
Potential pathogenicity of Cladosporium tennuisimum, Phaeoisaria clematidis and Ramichloridium subulatum in a mouse model
TLDR
Though the fungi showed limited pathogenic potential, they may represent a hazard under conditions of compromised host immunity.
Dematiaceous fungi are an increasing cause of human disease.
  • S. Rossmann, P. Cernoch, J. Davis
  • Medicine, Biology
    Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
  • 1996
TLDR
The dematiaceous fungi appear to be an increasing cause of human disease at The Methodist Hospital, in Houston, Texas, and diabetics and patients on steroids may be at particular risk.
The medically important dematiaceous fungi and their identification
Summary. Dematiaceous fungi include a large group of organisms that are darkly pigmented (dark brown, olivaceous, or black). In most cases the pigment is melanin, and specifically,
Clues About Chromoblastomycotic and Other Dematiaceous Fungal Pathogens Based on Wangiella as a Model
TLDR
Preliminary results with Ca2+ and the chromoblastomycotic fungi further validate the concept that W. dermatitidis continues to be an important model for dematiaceous pathogens of humans.
Melanized Fungi in Human Disease
TLDR
Though they are uncommon causes of disease, melanized fungi have been increasingly recognized as important pathogens, with most reports occurring in the past 20 years, and the spectrum of diseases with which they are associated has also broadened.
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 12 REFERENCES
Nasal phaeohyphomycosis caused by Bipolaris hawaiiensis.
TLDR
A bilateral nasal phaeohyphomycotic infection caused by Bipolaris hawaiiensis in an immunocompromised woman from India is described and local excision of the crusted lesion followed by application of 0.03% nystatin solution four times a day for 3 weeks cured the infection.
Xylohypha emmonsii sp. nov., a new agent of phaeohyphomycosis
TLDR
Xylohypha emmonsii Padhye, McGinnis et Ajello is described as a new dematiaceous opportunistic pathogen of humans and lower animals and by the development of short chains of asymmetrically bent to ellipsoid blastoconidia.
Chromoblastomycosis and phaeohyphomycosis: new concepts, diagnosis, and mycology.
  • M. Mcginnis
  • Medicine
    Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • 1983
Reclassification of Cladosporium bantianum in the genus Xylohypha
It is proposed that the dematiaceous hyphomycete Cladosporium bantianum (Saccardo) Borelli be transferred to the genus Xylohypha (Fries) Mason as Xylohypha bantiana (Saccardo) McGinnis, Padhye,
CRITICAL REVIEW OF HUMAN ISOLATES OF WANGIELLA DERMATITIDIS
TLDR
It is proposed that the ambiguous and inappropriate term "sclerotic cells" be replaced by the more appropriate term "muriform cells" to describe precisely the tissue form of the causal agents of chromoblastomycosis.
Comparative study of an isolate resembling Banti's fungus with Cladosporium trichoides.
TLDR
From this study, it was apparent that C. bantianum (Sacc.) Borelli and C. trichoides Emmons should be regarded as two separate species.
Kyste Sous-Cutané Mycosique (Phaeo-Sporotrichose) À Phialophora Gougerotii (Matruchot 1910) Borelli 1955, Observé Au Sénégal
TLDR
The authors propose the term “phaeo-sporotrichosis” for all mycotic abscesses induced by dematiaceous fungi belonging to these genera and species which although often very different the parasitic phase is always brown and filamentous and more or less fragmented.
The relationship of Cladosporium carrionii to Cladophialophora ajelloi.
TLDR
None of the C. bantianum isolates or commonly encountered saprophytic species of Cladosporium, such as C. cladosporioides and C. herbarum, showed the ability to form phialides on any of the media tested.
THE BLACK YEASTS AS DISEASE AGENTS: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE '
TLDR
The taxonomic position and roles as disease agents of the five species: Aureobasidium pullulans, Exophiala jeanselmei, E. spinifera, E.
A case of phaeohyphomycosis caused by a new species of Phialophora.
A subcutaneous fungus infection that developed in a kidney transplant patient on immunosuppressive maintenance therapy was found to be caused by a new species of Phialophora. This species, P. paras...
...
1
2
...