Subcultural Blogging. Online Journals and Group Involvement Among UK Goths

@inproceedings{Hodkinson2006SubculturalBO,
  title={Subcultural Blogging. Online Journals and Group Involvement Among UK Goths},
  author={Paul Hodkinson},
  year={2006}
}
ver the past decade, several studies have illustrated the capacity of the Internet to contribute to the development or the reinforcement of music scenes and subcultures. Such studies include Sarah Thornton’s identification of the role of Websites as a means of publicizing the details of raves and clubs as part of the UK “acid house” phenomenon and Marion Leonard’s focus upon the role of a network of Web-based “e-zines” (online fanzines) in the development of a global shared identity among Riot… CONTINUE READING

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