Subcognition and the Limits of the TuringTest

@article{French1990SubcognitionAT,
  title={Subcognition and the Limits of the TuringTest},
  author={Robert M. French},
  journal={Mind},
  year={1990},
  volume={99},
  pages={53-65}
}
Alan Turing, in his original article' about an imitation-game definition of intelligence, seems to be making two separate claims. The first, the philosophical claim, is that if a machine could pass the Turing Test, it would necessarily be intelligent. This claim I believe to be correct.2 His second point, the pragmatic claim, is that in the not-too-distant future it would in fact be possible actually to build such a machine. Turing clearly felt that it was important to establish both claims. He… 
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