Subacromial impingement syndrome—effectiveness of physiotherapy and manual therapy

@article{Gebremariam2013SubacromialIS,
  title={Subacromial impingement syndrome—effectiveness of physiotherapy and manual therapy},
  author={Lukas Gebremariam and Elaine M Hay and Renske van der Sande and Willem D Rinkel and Bart W. Koes and Bionka M. A. Huisstede},
  journal={British Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={48},
  pages={1202 - 1208}
}
Background The subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) includes the rotator cuff syndrome, tendonitis and bursitis of the shoulder. Treatment includes surgical and non-surgical modalities. Non-surgical treatment is used to reduce pain, to decrease the subacromial inflammation, to heal the compromised rotator cuff and to restore satisfactory function of the shoulder. To select the most appropriate non-surgical intervention and to identify gaps in scientific knowledge, we explored the… 

Effectiveness of physical therapy treatment of clearly defined subacromial pain: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

Exercise therapy should be the first-line treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome.

University of Birmingham Subacromial impingement syndrome and pain

This trial will investi-gate how to optimise the outcome of subacromial impingement syndrome from exercise (standardised advice and information leaflet versus physiotherapist-led exercise) and from subacROMial corticosteroid injection (blind versus ultrasound-guided), and provide long-term follow-up data on clinical and cost-effectiveness.

One-Year Outcome of Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection Compared With Manual Physical Therapy for the Management of the Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

This randomized, controlled trial compared the 1-year effectiveness of CSI and MPT for SIS management and found no clear evidence to suggest additional benefits of MPT to other interventions, indicating the need for further research.

Subacromial impingement syndrome and pain: protocol for a randomised controlled trial of exercise and corticosteroid injection (the SUPPORT trial)

This trial will investigate how to optimise the outcome of subacromial impingement syndrome from exercise (standardised advice and information leaflet versus physiotherapist-led exercise) and from subacROMial corticosteroid injection (blind versus ultrasound-guided), and provide long-term follow-up data on clinical and cost-effectiveness.

Evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of mechanical outlet impingement

An overview of the literature is provided and it seems likely that especially patients with a mechanical, and therefore structural, narrowing of the subacromial space can profit more from surgical management than patients with unspecific subacROMial pain.

The effectiveness of routine physiotherapy with and without neuromobilization in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

In an experimental setting, the delivery of neuromobilization led to significantly different outcomes in participants of SIS than in control group.

Effectiveness of manual therapy for cervical radiculopathy, a review

  • E. Thoomes
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
  • 2016
Current levels of evidence on the effectiveness of manual therapy interventions for patients with cervical radiculopathy are assessed, with low level evidence that cervical manipulation and mobilisation as unimodal interventions are effective on pain and range of motion at the immediate follow up.

Subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder manual therapy plus exercise intervention in individuals with subacromial impingement syndrome: a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial pilot study

The addition of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust to the shoulder treatment-only group did not significantly alter improvement in pain or function in patients with subacromial pathology and both approaches appeared to provide an equally notable benefit.

The Effectiveness Of Routine Physiotherapy With And Without Neuromobilization In Patients With Shoulder Impingement Syndrome On Pain And Functional Disability; A Randomized Control Clinical Trial

In an experimental setting, the delivery of neuromobilization leads to significantly different outcomes in participants than in control group, and over all pain and functional disability score were improved among experimental group relative to control group at 11th week.
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