Styles of male social behavior and their endocrine correlates among high‐ranking wild baboons

@article{Ray1992StylesOM,
  title={Styles of male social behavior and their endocrine correlates among high‐ranking wild baboons},
  author={J. Ray and R. Sapolsky},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={1992},
  volume={28}
}
We have previously studied the relationship between dominance rank and physiology among male olive baboons (Papio anubis) living freely in a national park in Africa. In stable hierarchies, such males have distinctive secretory profiles of glucocorticoids and of testosterone. We find that these endocrine features are not, in fact, purely markers of social dominance; instead, they are found only among dominant males with particular stylistic traits of social behavior. One intercorrelated… Expand
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TLDR
Studying the relationship between dominance rank and physiology among male olive baboons in Africa finds that low basal cortisol concentration is not, in fact, a marker of social dominance; instead, it is only found among dominant males with a certain style of dominance. Expand
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Elevated testosterone and high levels of aggression were unrelated to social status during the period of social stability, but were traits associated with dominant individuals during the unstable period. Expand
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As part of a long‐term study in behavioral endocrinology, wild olive baboons (Papio anubis) living in the Serengeti ecosystem of East Africa have been under study since 1978. The present reportExpand
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