Stuttering treatment research 1970-2005: I. Systematic review incorporating trial quality assessment of behavioral, cognitive, and related approaches.

@article{Bothe2006StutteringTR,
  title={Stuttering treatment research 1970-2005: I. Systematic review incorporating trial quality assessment of behavioral, cognitive, and related approaches.},
  author={Anne K. Bothe and Jason H. Davidow and Robin E. Bramlett and R. J. Ingham},
  journal={American journal of speech-language pathology},
  year={2006},
  volume={15 4},
  pages={
          321-41
        }
}
PURPOSE To complete a systematic review, with trial quality assessment, of published research about behavioral, cognitive, and related treatments for developmental stuttering. Goals included the identification of treatment recommendations and research needs based on the available high-quality evidence about stuttering treatment for preschoolers, school-age children, adolescents, and adults. METHOD Multiple readers reviewed 162 articles published between 1970 and 2005, using a written data… 
Stuttering treatment research 1970-2005: II. Systematic review incorporating trial quality assessment of pharmacological approaches.
TLDR
None of the pharmacological agents tested for stuttering have been shown in methodologically sound reports to improve stuttering frequency to below 5%, to reduce stuttering by at least half, or to improve relevant social, emotional, or cognitive variables.
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TLDR
Conclusions drawn from the extant research suggest that data to support the efficacy of behavioral intervention in children exists for a limited number of intervention strategies, based on a meager number of methodologically acceptable studies.
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  • Linguistics
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  • 2018
TLDR
It is suggested that John would be likely to benefit from a treatment program based on prolonged speech, and the basic structure of 1 possible such program is described, with an emphasis on the goals and outcomes that John could be expected to achieve.
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TLDR
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The issues behind the Stuttering Treatment Research Evaluation and Assessment Tool (STREAT), an instrument created to assist clinicians, researchers, students, and other readers in the process of critically appraising reports of stuttering treatment research, are presented.
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TLDR
A broad‐based systematic review of the literature reporting interventions for developmental stuttering found that most may be of benefit to at least some people who stutter, and there was evidence of considerable individual variation in response to these interventions.
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TLDR
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Abstract We explore school-aged (6–14 years old) stuttering interventions for children who stutter (CWS) using a scoping review. Database searches were conducted (EBSCO host, PubMed, PsycINFO,
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TLDR
A growing body of research has attempted to uncover the pathophysiology of stuttering, and referral for speech therapy remains the best option for children and adults.
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TLDR
Rigorous measurement and reporting of FOI in future intervention studies is required in order to better inform evidence-based practices for interventions with CWS.
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Stuttering treatment research 1970-2005: II. Systematic review incorporating trial quality assessment of pharmacological approaches.
TLDR
None of the pharmacological agents tested for stuttering have been shown in methodologically sound reports to improve stuttering frequency to below 5%, to reduce stuttering by at least half, or to improve relevant social, emotional, or cognitive variables.
The Stuttering Treatment Research Evaluation and Assessment Tool (STREAT): evaluating treatment research as part of evidence-based practice.
TLDR
The issues behind the Stuttering Treatment Research Evaluation and Assessment Tool (STREAT), an instrument created to assist clinicians, researchers, students, and other readers in the process of critically appraising reports of stuttering treatment research, are presented.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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