Stuttering: a view from neuroimaging

@article{Sandak2000StutteringAV,
  title={Stuttering: a view from neuroimaging},
  author={Rebecca Sandak and Julie A. Fiez},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2000},
  volume={356},
  pages={445-446}
}
Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus reversibly deteriorates stuttering in advanced Parkinson’s disease
TLDR
Clinical and imaging findings in this patient with PD treated by deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus support the hypothesis that the basal ganglia circuitry plays an important role in the pathophysiology of stuttering.
Speech Fluency Improvement in Developmental Stuttering Using Non-invasive Brain Stimulation: Insights From Available Evidence
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A review of recent advancements being applied to the treatment of developmental stuttering focuses future research toward more specific, targeted, and effective interventions for DS, based on neuromodulation of brain functioning.
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Neurological aspects of stuttering: summary overview of scientific findings
The aim of this article is to provide a summary overview of some of the more important scientific evidence of neurological differences between stutterers and non-stutterers. Stuttering is a complex
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