Studying Synchronization to a Musical Beat in Nonhuman Animals

@article{Patel2009StudyingST,
  title={Studying Synchronization to a Musical Beat in Nonhuman Animals},
  author={Aniruddh D. Patel and John Rehner Iversen and Micah R. Bregman and Irena Schulz},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={1169}
}
The recent discovery of spontaneous synchronization to music in a nonhuman animal (the sulphur‐crested cockatoo Cacatua galerita eleonora) raises several questions. How does this behavior differ from nonmusical synchronization abilities in other species, such as synchronized frog calls or firefly flashes? What significance does the behavior have for debates over the evolution of human music? What kinds of animals can synchronize to musical rhythms, and what are the key methodological issues for… Expand
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Experimental evidence for synchronization to a beat in a sulphur-crested cockatoo is reported and it is shown that the animal spontaneously adjusts the tempo of its rhythmic movements to stay synchronized with the beat. Expand
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