Study design and mark-recapture estimates of dispersal: a case study with the endangered damselfly Coenagrion mercuriale

@article{Hassall2011StudyDA,
  title={Study design and mark-recapture estimates of dispersal: a case study with the endangered damselfly Coenagrion mercuriale},
  author={Christopher Hassall and David W. J. Thompson},
  journal={Journal of Insect Conservation},
  year={2011},
  volume={16},
  pages={111-120}
}
Accurate data on dispersal ability are vital to the understanding of how species are affected by fragmented landscapes. However, three factors may limit the ability of field studies to detect a representative sample of dispersal events: (1) the number of individuals monitored, (2) the area over which the study is conducted and (3) the time over which the study is conducted. Using sub-sampling of mark-release-recapture data from a study on the endangered damselfly Coenagrion mercuriale… CONTINUE READING

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