Studies with low response proportions may be less biased than studies with high response proportions.

@article{Stang2004StudiesWL,
  title={Studies with low response proportions may be less biased than studies with high response proportions.},
  author={Andreas Stang and Karl-Heinz J{\"o}ckel},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={159 2},
  pages={
          204-10
        }
}
The association between the response proportion in epidemiologic studies and nonresponse bias is complicated, because exposure prevalences and misclassification errors may vary by recruitment wave. In this paper, the authors illustrate the effect of varying degrees of wave-specific nondifferential exposure measurement error in a dichotomous exposure on the relative risk in a hypothetical cohort study of 5,000 participants, by recruitment wave. The field phase of the hypothetical cohort study… CONTINUE READING

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