Studies on a toxic metabolite from the mould Wallemia.

@article{Wood1990StudiesOA,
  title={Studies on a toxic metabolite from the mould Wallemia.},
  author={Gillian M. Wood and P J Mann and D F Lewis and W. J. Reid and Maurice Osburn Moss},
  journal={Food additives and contaminants},
  year={1990},
  volume={7 1},
  pages={
          69-77
        }
}
While monitoring the occurrence of toxigenic moulds in foods, using a bioassay screen, it was shown that an isolate of Wallemia sebi produced toxic effects in several of the bioassays. The toxic metabolite was isolated and purified using solvent extraction, TLC and HPLC coupled with the brine shrimp assay to monitor the toxic fractions. The purified toxin, which we propose to call walleminol A, has been partially characterized by mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, ultraviolet and… Expand
Salt induces biosynthesis of hemolytically active compounds in the xerotolerant food-borne fungus Wallemia sebi.
TLDR
The lytic activity of the extract shows concentration-dependent hemolysis and preferential activity toward lipid membranes with greater fluidity and its potential involvement in the formation of lesions in subcutaneous infections, in farmer's lung disease, and in consumption of food and feed that are contaminated with food-borne W. sebi. Expand
Production of Secondary Metabolites in Extreme Environments: Food- and Airborne Wallemia spp. Produce Toxic Metabolites at Hypersaline Conditions
TLDR
Mass spectrometric analysis of selected extracts revealed that NaCl in the medium affects the production of some compounds with substantial biological activities (wallimidione, walleminol,Walleminone, UCA1064-A and UCA 1064-B). Expand
The Genus Wallemia—From Contamination of Food to Health Threat
TLDR
This work defines these fungi as filamentous food-borne pathogenic fungi, which are found in various osmotically challenged environments, such as dry, salted, or highly sugared foods, dry feed, hypersaline waters of solar salterns, salt crystals, indoor and outdoor air, and agriculture aerosols. Expand
Extrolites of Wallemia sebi, a very common fungus in the built environment.
TLDR
Wallemia sebi has been primarily known as a spoilage fungus of dried, salted fish and other foods that are salty or sweet, but this fungus is also very common in house dust and its allergens have not been described previously. Expand
Occurrence of xerophilic fungi in bakery gingerbread production.
TLDR
It was found that Eurotium species were more resistant than W. sebi against elevated temperature and preserving agents, and Preservation against xerophilic fungi was more effective with the use of propionic acid than with potassium sorbate. Expand
Fungal secondary metabolites as harmful indoor air contaminants: 10 years on
TLDR
The available data on the low-molecular-weight toxins reliably known from fungi common on damp building materials, the toxins that have been measured on mouldy building materials and the new understanding of the role that they play in the documented health effects of individuals living and working in damp and mouldy buildings are summarized. Expand
Detection and Quantification of Wallemia sebi in Aerosols by Real-Time PCR, Conventional PCR, and Cultivation
TLDR
Two sets of PCR primers specific to Wallemia sebi that can be applied in either conventional PCR or real-time PCR for rapid detection and quantification of the fungus in environmental samples proved to be highly specific and sensitive for W. sebi detection even in a high background of other fungal DNAs. Expand
Halophily reloaded: new insights into the extremophilic life-style of Wallemia with the description of Wallemia hederae sp. nov
TLDR
Tests of the activity of a wide range of extracellular enzymes in the presence of NaCl suggested that Wallemia is well-adapted to substrates with a reduced water activity, and in-vitro growth on media that contain the chaotropic salt MgCl2. Expand
A Taxonomic Revision of the Wallemia sebi Species Complex
TLDR
The phylogenetic analyses based species hypotheses from a companion study are confirmed and applied to guide phenotypic assessment of W. sebi sensu stricto and three new species described as W. mellicola, W. Canadensis, and W. tropicalis are confirmed. Expand
Wallemia peruviensis sp. nov., a new xerophilic fungus from an agricultural setting in South America
TLDR
Isolates of the xerophilic genus Wallemia were obtained from the rooftop of a house made of red brick and cement in an agronomic field planted with common beans and maize in Pachacamac, Lima, Peru and were shown to represent a novel species, described as W. peruviensis sp. Expand
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