Studies of North American Indian Languages

@inproceedings{Mithun1990StudiesON,
  title={Studies of North American Indian Languages},
  author={Marianne Mithun},
  year={1990}
}
The study of North American Indian languages has been shaped by several circumstances. Since its beginning, most research has been based in fieldwork: Data have come from direct contact with speakers, usually in their own cultural settings, rather than from secondary sources. Although the number of languages indigenous to North America is large, several hundred, the number of scholars working with most of them has been relatively small, often only one or two individuals per language. A center… CONTINUE READING

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