Studies made by simulating systole at necropsy. VIII. Significance of the pulse pressure.

Abstract

LONG before blood pressure could be measured in the clinic, the nature of the relation between the amplitude of the pulse and the cardiac stroke volume was discussed. It is mentioned in a report of studies of the recorded pulse by Roy and Adami in 1890,1 in a similar report by Mackenzie in 1902,2 and surely the same idea must have occurred much earlier to countless imaginative doctors who, when feeling the pulse, speculated on the aspect of cardiac performance that produced the sensation they perceived through their fingers. During this era, exact knowledge of the relationship was not possible, for the amplitude of the recorded pulse varied with the pressure with which the pick-up unit was applied to the artery, and it was therefore difficult to interpret in quantitative terms. As soon as blood pressure could be measured in the clinic, more exact knowledge was sought.' Thus, a direct relation between pulse pressure and cardiac stroke volume was proposed by Erlanger and Hooker in 1905.a Later, many attempts were made to define the relation more exactly, and several methods designed to estimate cardiac stroke volume from pulse pressure were proposed, based on the theoretic conceptioins favored by the various authors at that time.519 Recently, workers from this laboratory have brought forward methods of estimating

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Cite this paper

@article{Starr1956StudiesMB, title={Studies made by simulating systole at necropsy. VIII. Significance of the pulse pressure.}, author={Isaac Starr}, journal={Circulation}, year={1956}, volume={14 6}, pages={1117-28} }