Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

@inproceedings{Solomon1996StudentNO,
  title={Student Nitric Oxide Explorer},
  author={Stanley C. Solomon and Charles A. Barth and Penina Axelrad and Scott M. Bailey and Ronald Brown and Randal L. Davis and Timothy E. Holden and Richard A. Kohnert and Frederick W. Lacy and Michael T. Mcgrath and Darren C. O'Connor and Jeffrey P. Perich and Heather Reed and Mark A. Salada and John Simpson and Jeffrey M. Srinivasan and George A. Stafford and Stephen R. Steg and Gail A. Tate and James Westfall and Neil R. White and Peter R. Withnell and Thomas N. Woods},
  booktitle={Optics \& Photonics},
  year={1996}
}
The Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) is a small scientific spacecraft designed to launch on a PegasusTM XL vehicle for the Student Explorer Demonstration Initiative. Its scientific goals are to measure nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere and to analyze the solar and magnetospheric influences that create it and cause its abundance to vary dramatically. The SNOE ('snowy') spacecraft and instrumentation is being designed and built at the University of Colorado Laboratory for… 

The SNOE Spacecraft: Integration, Test, Launch, Operation, and On-orbit Performance

The Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) was launched on 26 February 1998. Its objectives are to measure nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere, to analyze the solar and auroral fluxes that

Altitude determination of ultraviolet measurements made by the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

The spinning motion of the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer spacecraft allows for the measurement of limb profiles of atmospheric radiation. In order to interpret the observations an accurate altitude

Auroral production of nitric oxide measured by the SNOE satellite

Measurements by the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite ultraviolet spectrometer confirm that nitric oxide density is elevated in the polar thermosphere. Contemporaneous measurements by

An empirical model of nitric oxide in the lower thermosphere

[1] The Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite made near-continuous measurements of nitric oxide in the lower thermosphere (97.5 km to 150 km) between March 1998 and September 2000. Using

Comparisons of thermospheric high-latitude nitric oxide observations from SNOE and global auroral X-ray bremsstrahlung observations from PIXIE

[1] Three years (March 1998 through March 2001) of nitric oxide (NO) observations in the Northern Hemispheric thermosphere (90-170 km) as made by the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) spacecraft

Measurements of the solar soft X‐ray irradiance by the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer: First analysis and underflight calibrations

Beginning on March 11, 1998, the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite has made daily observations of the solar soft X-ray irradiance. These measurements are carried out by a multichannel

Simulating Nitric Oxide in the lower thermosphere using a 3D model.

Nitric oxide (NO), despite being a minor species, influences the chemistry, composition and energy balance of the earth’s atmosphere above 90 kilometers. Variations in its density have been shown to

Measurements of the solar soft X‐ray irradiance from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

Beginning on March 11, 1998, the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite has made daily observations of the solar soft x‐ray irradiance. These measurements are carried out by a multi‐channel

Relative Importance of Nitric Oxide Physical Drivers in the Lower Thermosphere

Nitric oxide (NO) observations from the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment and Student Nitric Oxide Explorer satellite instruments are investigated to determine the relative importance of drivers

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