Structure of association in impala, Aepyceros melampus

@article{Murray2004StructureOA,
  title={Structure of association in impala, Aepyceros melampus},
  author={Martyn G. Murray},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={9},
  pages={23-33}
}
  • M. Murray
  • Published 1 August 1981
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Summary1.The associatons and movements of 400 marked impala of known age were studied in the Sengwa Wildlife Research Area, Zimbabwe, from May 1975 to May 1978.2.Female and juvenile impala were dispersed in a clan system. The average level of association (measured by Sorensen's index) between members of the same clan was 0.27 and between members of neighbouring clans 0.02. There was no significant correlation between separation of individuals' centres of home range and association within clans… 

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