Structure and function of the vomeronasal system: an update

@article{Halpern2003StructureAF,
  title={Structure and function of the vomeronasal system: an update},
  author={Mimi Halpern and Alino Mart{\'i}nez-Marcos},
  journal={Progress in Neurobiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={70},
  pages={245-318}
}
Several developments during the past 15 years have profoundly affected our understanding of the vomeronasal system (VNS) of vertebrates. In the mid 1990s, the vomeronasal epithelium of mammals was found to contain two populations of receptor cells, based on their expression of G-proteins. These two populations of neurons were subsequently found to project their axons to different parts of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), forming the basis of segregated pathways with possibly heterogeneous… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Xenopus V1R vomeronasal receptor family is expressed in the main olfactory system.
TLDR
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