Structure and function of hindlimb feathers in Archaeopteryx lithographica

@inproceedings{Longrich2006StructureAF,
  title={Structure and function of hindlimb feathers in Archaeopteryx lithographica},
  author={Nicholas R. Longrich},
  booktitle={Paleobiology},
  year={2006}
}
  • N. Longrich
  • Published in Paleobiology 1 September 2006
  • Biology
Abstract This study examines the morphology and function of hindlimb plumage in Archaeopteryx lithographica. Feathers cover the legs of the Berlin specimen, extending from the cranial surface of the tibia and the caudal margins of both tibia and femur. These feathers exhibit features of flight feathers rather than contour feathers, including vane asymmetry, curved shafts, and a self-stabilizing overlap pattern. Many of these features facilitate lift generation in the wings and tail of birds… Expand

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