Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice

@article{Moore2011StructuralTI,
  title={Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice},
  author={Emily B. Moore and Valeria Molinero},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={479},
  pages={506-508}
}
One of water’s unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature, TH ≈ 232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization—including the size and structure of critical nuclei—has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase on moving into the supercooled region, according… 

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