Structural and Functional Diversity of Connexin Genes in the Mouse and Human Genome

@inproceedings{Willecke2002StructuralAF,
  title={Structural and Functional Diversity of Connexin Genes in the Mouse and Human Genome},
  author={Klaus Willecke and J{\"u}rgen Eiberger and Joachim Degen and Dominik Eckardt and Alessandro Romualdi and Martin Güldenagel and Urban Deutsch and Goran Söhl},
  booktitle={Biological chemistry},
  year={2002}
}
Abstract Gap junctions are clustered channels between contacting cells through which direct intercellular communication via diffusion of ions and metabolites can occur. Two hemichannels, each built up of six connexin protein subunits in the plasma membrane of adjacent cells, can dock to each other to form conduits between cells. We have recently screened mouse and human genomic data bases and have found 19 connexin (Cx) genes in the mouse genome and 20 connexin genes in the human genome. One… 

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