Stronger back muscles reduce the incidence of vertebral fractures: a prospective 10 year follow-up of postmenopausal women.

@article{Sinaki2002StrongerBM,
  title={Stronger back muscles reduce the incidence of vertebral fractures: a prospective 10 year follow-up of postmenopausal women.},
  author={M. Sinaki and E. Itoi and H. Wahner and P. Wollan and R. Gelzcer and B. Mullan and D. Collins and S. Hodgson},
  journal={Bone},
  year={2002},
  volume={30 6},
  pages={
          836-41
        }
}
The long-term protective effect of stronger back muscles on the spine was determined in 50 healthy white postmenopausal women, aged 58-75 years, 8 years after they had completed a 2 year randomized, controlled trial. [...] Key Method Twenty-seven subjects had performed progressive, resistive back-strengthening exercises for 2 years and 23 had served as controls.Expand
Back Progressive Resistive Exercise Program to Reduce Risk of Vertebral Fractures
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TLDR
It is demonstrated that active women had better range of spinal motion than sedentary women, but they did not differ significantly in severity of thoracic kyphosis, BES and BMD. Expand
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TLDR
Mainly home-based exercises followed by voluntary home training seem to have a long-term effect on balance and gait and may even protect high-risk elderly women from hip fractures. Expand
Wearing an active spinal orthosis improves back extensor strength in women with osteoporotic vertebral fractures
TLDR
The results imply that Spinomed III could be recommended for women with vertebral fractures as a supplement to traditional back strengthening exercises, and demonstrate a clinically relevant improvement in the back extensor strength. Expand
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TLDR
Low-intensity back-strengthening exercise was effective in improving the quality of life and back extensor strength in patients with osteoporosis. Expand
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TLDR
This is the first 12 month-randomized clinical trial of exercise in osteoporotic women with a vertebral fracture that demonstrates improvement of three key outcome measures: quality of life, functional mobility, and balance. Expand
Effects of a New Spinal Orthosis on Posture, Trunk Strength, and Quality of Life in Women with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis: A Randomized Trial
TLDR
The use of an orthosis increases trunk muscle strength and thus improves posture in patients with vertebral fractures caused by osteoporosis, and a better quality of life is achieved by pain reduction, decreased limitations of daily living, and improved well-being. Expand
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TLDR
Patients in whom increased torsional and compressive mechanical loading pressures occurring during yoga SFE resulted in de novo VCF are identified, highlighting the need for selectivity in yoga poses in populations at increased fracture risk. Expand
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TLDR
Six months’ treatment by an activating spinal orthosis showed no significant difference in back pain, back extensor strength, or kyphosis index between the three groups, indicating that the spinal Orthosis may become an alternative training method. Expand
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