Striatal activity during intentional switching depends on pattern stability.

@article{Luca2010StriatalAD,
  title={Striatal activity during intentional switching depends on pattern stability.},
  author={Cinzia Rachele De Luca and K. J. Jantzen and Silvia Comani and Maurizio Bertollo and J A Scott Kelso},
  journal={The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience},
  year={2010},
  volume={30 9},
  pages={
          3167-74
        }
}
The theoretical framework of coordination dynamics posits complementary neural mechanisms to maintain complex behavioral patterns under circumstances that may render them unstable and to voluntarily switch between behaviors if changing internal or external conditions so demand. A candidate neural structure known to play a role in both the selection and maintenance of intentional behavior is the basal ganglia. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the role of basal… CONTINUE READING

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