Stretching before exercise does not reduce the risk of local muscle injury: a critical review of the clinical and basic science literature.

@article{Shrier1999StretchingBE,
  title={Stretching before exercise does not reduce the risk of local muscle injury: a critical review of the clinical and basic science literature.},
  author={Ian Shrier},
  journal={Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine},
  year={1999},
  volume={9 4},
  pages={
          221-7
        }
}
  • I. Shrier
  • Published 1 October 1999
  • Medicine
  • Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical and basic science evidence surrounding the hypothesis that stretching immediately before exercise prevents injury. DATA SOURCES AND SELECTION MEDLINE was searched using MEDLINE subject headings (MeSH) and textwords for English- and French-language articles related to stretching and muscle injury. Additional references were reviewed from the bibliographies, and from citation searches on key articles. All articles related to stretching and injury or… Expand

Paper Mentions

Does Stretching Improve Performance?: A Systematic and Critical Review of the Literature
  • I. Shrier
  • Medicine
  • Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
  • 2004
TLDR
An acute bout of stretching does not improve force or jump height, and the results for running speed are contradictory, although there is no evidence that it improves running economy. Expand
The impact of stretching on sports injury risk: a systematic review of the literature.
TLDR
There is not sufficient evidence to endorse or discontinue routine stretching before or after exercise to prevent injury among competitive or recreational athletes and further research is urgently needed. Expand
A Systematic Review into the Efficacy of Static Stretching as Part of a Warm-Up for the Prevention of Exercise-Related Injury
TLDR
There is moderate to strong evidence that routine application of static stretching does not reduce overall injury rates, and there is preliminary evidence, however, that static stretching may reduce musculotendinous injuries. Expand
Stretching before and after exercise: effect on muscle soreness and injury risk.
TLDR
This review included randomized or quasirandomized investigations that studied the effects of any stretching technique, before or after exercise, on delayed-onset muscle soreness, risk of injury, or athletic performance. Expand
SymbolDoes Stretching Reduce—or Increase—the Risk of Injury?
  • 2000
4 ©2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 800-787-8981 Stretching immediately before exercise does not reduce the risk of local muscle injury, according to a critical review of the scientific evidence.Expand
Effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury: systematic review
TLDR
Stretching before or after exercising does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury, but the generality of this finding needs testing. Expand
The efficacy of stretching for prevention of exercise-related injury: a systematic review of the literature.
TLDR
No definitive conclusions can be drawn as to the value of stretching for reducing the risk of exercise-related injury because of the paucity, heterogeneity and poor quality of the available studies. Expand
Michael Gabriel review systematicon muscle soreness and risk of injury : Effects of stretching before and after exercising
Objective To determine the effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness after exercise, risk of injury, and athletic performance. Method Systematic review. Data sourcesExpand
Prevention of sports injury I: a systematic review of applied biomechanics and physiology outcomes research
TLDR
The decrease in crossover study design and increase in RCTs over time suggest a shift in study design for injury prevention articles, and the change in research focus from equipment interventions, which have been decreasing since 2000, to training interventions, who have been increasing (213% increase). Expand
Squat Lifting Technique—an Ergonomic Myth?
  • 2000
4 ©2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 800-787-8981 Stretching immediately before exercise does not reduce the risk of local muscle injury, according to a critical review of the scientific evidence.Expand
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References

A randomized trial of preexercise stretching for prevention of lower-limb injury.
TLDR
A typical muscle stretching protocol performed during preexercise warm-ups does not produce clinically meaningful reductions in risk of exercise-related injury in army recruits, but fitness may be an important, modifiable risk factor. Expand