Stress sensitivity and the development of affective disorders

@article{Bale2006StressSA,
  title={Stress sensitivity and the development of affective disorders},
  author={T. Bale},
  journal={Hormones and Behavior},
  year={2006},
  volume={50},
  pages={529-533}
}
  • T. Bale
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Hormones and Behavior
Depressive disorders are the most common form of mental illness in America, affecting females twice as often as males. The great variability of symptoms and responses to therapeutic treatment emphasize the complex underlying neurobiology of disease onset and progression. Evidence from human and animal studies reveals a vital link between individual stress sensitivity and the predisposition toward mood disorders. While the stress response is essential for maintenance of homeostasis and survival… Expand
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