Stress revisited: A critical evaluation of the stress concept

@article{Koolhaas2011StressRA,
  title={Stress revisited: A critical evaluation of the stress concept},
  author={J. Koolhaas and A. Bartolomucci and B. Buwalda and S. Boer and G. Fl{\"u}gge and S. Korte and P. Meerlo and R. Murison and B. Olivier and P. Palanza and G. Richter-Levin and A. Sgoifo and T. Steimer and O. Stiedl and G. V. Dijk and M. W{\"o}hr and E. Fuchs},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2011},
  volume={35},
  pages={1291-1301}
}
With the steadily increasing number of publications in the field of stress research it has become evident that the conventional usage of the stress concept bears considerable problems. The use of the term 'stress' to conditions ranging from even the mildest challenging stimulation to severely aversive conditions, is in our view inappropriate. Review of the literature reveals that the physiological 'stress' response to appetitive, rewarding stimuli that are often not considered to be stressors… Expand

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