Stress-Related Growth Among Women Living with HIV/AIDS: Examination of an Explanatory Model

@article{Siegel2005StressRelatedGA,
  title={Stress-Related Growth Among Women Living with HIV/AIDS: Examination of an Explanatory Model},
  author={Karolynn Siegel and Eric W Schrimshaw and Sheindy Pretter},
  journal={Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={28},
  pages={403-414}
}
Despite the increasing interest in the perceived benefits or growth resulting from stress and illness, there has been little investigation of the correlates of this stress-related growth, particularly among HIV-infected individuals. Following the Schaefer and Moos model (1992;1998), the association of affective states, coping, stressor characteristics, individual resources, and social resources with stress-related growth was examined among 138 women living with HIV/AIDS. Most women (63… 
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