Stress-Induced Depression Is Alleviated by Aerobic Exercise Through Up-Regulation of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A Receptors in Rats

@article{Kim2015StressInducedDI,
  title={Stress-Induced Depression Is Alleviated by Aerobic Exercise Through Up-Regulation of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A Receptors in Rats},
  author={T. Kim and Baek Vin Lim and D. Baek and Dong-Soo Ryu and Jin Hee Seo},
  journal={International Neurourology Journal},
  year={2015},
  volume={19},
  pages={27 - 33}
}
  • T. Kim, Baek Vin Lim, +2 authors Jin Hee Seo
  • Published 2015
  • Medicine
  • International Neurourology Journal
  • Purpose: Stress is associated with depression, which induces many psychiatric disorders. Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT), acts as a biochemical messenger and regulator in the brain. It also mediates several important physiological functions. Depression is closely associated with an overactive bladder. In the present study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on stress-induced depression while focusing on the expression of 5-HT 1A (5-H1A) receptors in the dorsal… CONTINUE READING
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