Stress, social support, and the buffering hypothesis.

@article{Cohen1985StressSS,
  title={Stress, social support, and the buffering hypothesis.},
  author={S. Cohen and T. Wills},
  journal={Psychological bulletin},
  year={1985},
  volume={98 2},
  pages={
          310-57
        }
}
The purpose of this article is to determine whether the positive association between social support and well-being is attributable more to an overall beneficial effect of support (main- or direct-effect model) or to a process of support protecting persons from potentially adverse effects of stressful events (buffering model). The review of studies is organized according to (a) whether a measure assesses support structure or function, and (b) the degree of specificity (vs. globality) of the… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
In this study, a new psychosocial training for social relationships for mildly and heavily stressed adults will be evaluated. In a 6-module course, with four 3-day modules and two… Expand
ConditionsFamily Relations, Health Behavior, Program Evaluation, (+5 more)
InterventionBehavioral
Interventional Clinical Trial
Resilience means a healthcare provider's ability to cope, recover, and learn from stressful events, as well as their access to resources that promote health and well-being. Neonatal… Expand
ConditionsBurnout, Professional, Resilience, Psychological
InterventionBehavioral
Perceived support, received support, and adjustment to stressful life events.
TLDR
Analysis of cross-sectional data from a large-scale national survey shows that perceived support is, in general, more important than received support in predicting adjustment to stressful life events and presents evidence that the influence of received support may be mediated by perceived support. Expand
Social support and health: The role of affiliative need as a moderator
Abstract This study sought to demonstrate that different types of support (e.g., socioemotional vs material) have differential effects upon well-being as a function of affiliative need. Items on aExpand
Perceptions of social support, receipt of supportive behaviors, and locus of control as moderators of the effects of chronic stress
  • R. Cummins
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • American journal of community psychology
  • 1988
ConclusionAlthough the cross-sectional methodology of the present study limits causal inference, the results concerning the buffering effects of received social support for those who have perceptionsExpand
Appraisal and Social Support as Moderators between Stress and Physical and Psychological Quality of Life.
  • Erica Szkody, Cliff McKinney
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Stress and health : journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress
  • 2020
TLDR
The expansion of the original stress-buffering hypothesis to include primary or secondary appraisal in an emerging adult population (N = 854) on physical and psychological health outcomes and the additional moderating effects of gender were examined. Expand
Resource or Hindrance? The benefits and costs of social support for functional difficulties and its implications for depressive symptoms
TLDR
The conditions in which perceived social support is likely to act as a buffer or amplifier by considering individual differences in self-perceptions of aging are investigated, offering insights as to the boundary conditions associated with the (positive) effects of social support and SPA. Expand
The relationship between social support and physiological processes: a review with emphasis on underlying mechanisms and implications for health.
TLDR
Recommendations and directions for future research include the importance of conceptualizing social support as a multidimensional construct, examination of potential mechanisms across levels of analyses, and attention to the physiological process of interest. Expand
An Observational and Longitudinal Investigation of the Stress-Buffering and Main Effects Models of Social Support
This study investigates the relationship between social support and stress in newlywed couples. The main purpose of this study is to compare two models of social support: 1) the stress‐bufferingExpand
Effects of Daily Social Support on Tension-Reduction Drinking
Researchers have argued that in times of need having supportive, caring people available can make all the difference between achieving optimum health and well-being or suffering from mental orExpand
Social support and depressed mood: a structural analysis.
TLDR
It is argued that structure should be conceived of as participation and involvement in community and social relations, which may include community ties, social networks and intimate ties, and should exhibit differentiated effects on mental health. Expand
The effects of social support on adjustment to stress: The mediating role of coping
The present research tested Thoits' (1986) proposal that coping mediates in the relationship between social support and adjustment to stress in two different contexts, namely adjustment to workExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 188 REFERENCES
Positive Events and Social Supports as Buffers of Life Change Stress
A perceived availability of social support measure (the ISEL) was designed with independent subscales measuring four separate support functions. In a sample of college students, both perceivedExpand
Social support as a contingency in psychological well-being.
This paper considers the association between social support, conceived and assessed from a social-psychological perspective, and psychological well-being. The magnitude and consistency of theExpand
Stress and depression: a test of the buffering model of social support.
TLDR
These findings support the corollary that the lack of social support contributes to the creation of depressive symptoms and may itself be important in ameliorating depressive symptoms. Expand
The stress-buffering role of social support. Problems and prospects for systematic investigation.
  • A. Dean, N. Lin
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The Journal of nervous and mental disease
  • 1977
TLDR
This paper offers a selective review of the essential status of empirical knowledge, an examination of the nature and significance of social support systems, and detailed proposals for approaching problems of measurement and research design. Expand
Measuring the Functional Components of Social Support
In the last several years, we have been interested in the role social supports play in protecting people from the pathogenic effects of stress. By social supports, we scan the resources that areExpand
Social support, life stress, and psychological adjustment: A test of the buffering hypothesis
  • B. Wilcox
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • American journal of community psychology
  • 1981
TLDR
The hypothesis that social support mediates or serves as a buffer between life events and psychological distress was tested for each of the two support measures in combination with the life events measure and all four of the resulting hypotheses were supported. Expand
Social support, occupational stress, and health.
TLDR
The buffering hypothesis for mental and physical health variables (anxiety, depression, irritation, and somatic symptoms), but, as in the previous three studies, fail to support thebuffering hypothesis in regard to job-related strains. Expand
Social Support and the Study of Personal Relationships
The study of social support as a resource for resisting stress has been pursued independently of its role in the initiation and maintenance of personal relationships. Moreover, the tendency to defineExpand
Conceptual, methodological, and theoretical problems in studying social support as a buffer against life stress.
  • P. Thoits
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of health and social behavior
  • 1982
TLDR
Empirical work on the buffering hypothesis is reviewed, alternate conceptualizations and operationalizations of support are outlined, a refined hypothesis and model for analysis are presented, and three theoretical approaches that may be used to explain the interrelationships between support, events, and disturbance are suggested. Expand
A comparison of the moderating effects of personal coping resources on the impact of exposure to stress in two groups
There has been considerable interest in recent years in identifying coping resources which moderate the effects of stress. The evidence to date has not adequately supported the notion that socialExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...