Stress, psychiatric co-morbidity and coping in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria

@article{Chung2010StressPC,
  title={Stress, psychiatric co-morbidity and coping in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria},
  author={Man Cheung Chung and Christine Symons and Jane Gilliam and Edward R. Kaminski},
  journal={Psychology \& Health},
  year={2010},
  volume={25},
  pages={477 - 490}
}
This study examined life event stress, perceived stress and psychiatric co-morbidity among patients with Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (CIU). It also investigated the relationship between coping, stress, the severity of CIU and psychiatric co-morbidity. Total of 100 CIU patients and 60 allergy patients participated in the study. They completed the General Health Questionnaire, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Ways of Coping Checklist. Compared with… Expand
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