Streptococcus bovis: Causal or incidental involvement in cancer of the colon?

@article{Hausen2006StreptococcusBC,
  title={Streptococcus bovis: Causal or incidental involvement in cancer of the colon?},
  author={Harald Hausen},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2006},
  volume={119}
}
  • H. Hausen
  • Published 1 November 2006
  • Medicine, Biology
  • International Journal of Cancer
In this issue, Tjalsma and colleagues from the University of Nijmegen Medical Center report on the detection of immune reactions against Streptococcus bovis antigens in sera of 11 out of 12 colon cancer patients and in 3 out of 4 patients with colon polyps. No positive reaction was observed in 8 control subjects. They used immunocapture tandem mass spectrometry to identify an immune reaction against bacterial antigens and found that one of the diagnostic antigens represents a surface-exposed… 

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