Strengthening and neuromuscular reeducation of the gluteus maximus in a triathlete with exercise-associated cramping of the hamstrings.

@article{Wagner2010StrengtheningAN,
  title={Strengthening and neuromuscular reeducation of the gluteus maximus in a triathlete with exercise-associated cramping of the hamstrings.},
  author={Tracey Wagner and Nazly Behnia and Won-Kay Lau Ancheta and Richard Shen and Shawn Farrokhi and Christopher M. Powers},
  journal={The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy},
  year={2010},
  volume={40 2},
  pages={
          112-9
        }
}
STUDY DESIGN Case report. OBJECTIVE To highlight the effects of an intervention program consisting of strengthening and neuromuscular reeducation of the gluteus maximus in an elite triathlete with exercise-associated muscle cramping (EAMC). BACKGROUND Researchers have described 2 theories concerning the etiology of EAMC: (1) muscle fatigue and (2) electrolyte deficit. As such, interventions for EAMC typically consist of stretching/strengthening of the involved muscle and/or supplements to… 

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