Stratigraphic, chronological and behavioural contexts of Pleistocene Homo sapiens from Middle Awash, Ethiopia

@article{Clark2003StratigraphicCA,
  title={Stratigraphic, chronological and behavioural contexts of Pleistocene Homo sapiens from Middle Awash, Ethiopia},
  author={J. Desmond Clark and Yonas Beyene and Giday Woldegabriel and William K. Hart and Paul R. Renne and Henry Gilbert and Alban Defleur and Gen Suwa and Shigehiro Katoh and Kenneth R. Ludwig and Jean-Renaud Boisserie and Berhane Abrha Asfaw and Tim D. White},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={423},
  pages={747-752}
}
Clarifying the geographic, environmental and behavioural contexts in which the emergence of anatomically modern Homo sapiens occurred has proved difficult, particularly because Africa lacked adequate geochronological, palaeontological and archaeological evidence. The discovery of anatomically modern Homo sapiens fossils at Herto, Ethiopia, changes this. Here we report on stratigraphically associated Late Middle Pleistocene artefacts and fossils from fluvial and lake margin sandstones of the… Expand
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There is a general consensus that our species emerged first in Africa. Currently, the best-known skeletal evidence for the earliest anatomically modern Homo sapiens (AMHs) derives from sites in theExpand
Pleistocene Homo sapiens from Middle Awash, Ethiopia
TLDR
Fossilized hominid crania from Herto, Middle Awash, Ethiopia are described and provide crucial evidence on the location, timing and contextual circumstances of the emergence of Homo sapiens. Expand
Hominin technological behavior during the later middle Pleistocene in the Gademotta formation, main Ethiopian rift
The evidence now strongly supports an African origin of the first Homo sapiens. Currently, the best-known fossil evidence for the earliest H. sapiens derives from the Omo Kibish and Herto sites inExpand
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The Aduma cranium shows a mosaic of cranial features shared with "premodern" and anatomically modern Homo sapiens, but the posterior and lateral cranial dimensions, and most of its anatomy, are centered among modern humans and resemble specimens from Omo, Skhul, and Qafzeh. Expand
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Fossilized hominid crania from Herto, Middle Awash, Ethiopia are described and provide crucial evidence on the location, timing and contextual circumstances of the emergence of Homo sapiens. Expand
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