Strategies of the Cooperatively Breeding Noisy Miner to Reduce Nest Predation

@article{Arnold2000StrategiesOT,
  title={Strategies of the Cooperatively Breeding Noisy Miner to Reduce Nest Predation},
  author={Kathryn E. Arnold},
  journal={Emu - Austral Ornithology},
  year={2000},
  volume={100},
  pages={280 - 285}
}
  • K. Arnold
  • Published 1 November 2000
  • Biology
  • Emu - Austral Ornithology
Summary Nest predators reduce the reproductive success of passerines and may also threaten the safety of adult breeders. This paper investigates potential strategies used by cooperatively breeding Noisy Miners Manorina melanocephala at a site in south-east Queensland to reduce the risk to their nests. First, nearly twice as many nests were built from June to September as from October to January. Conversely, the availability of insects needed to feed chicks was known to be higher in the warmer… 
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Little support is found for the Additive Predation Model, with no significant influence of the density of woodland predators on the probability of nest predation, although landscape features at different spatial scales were important.
Sex-biased hatching sequences in the cooperatively breeding Noisy Miner
TLDR
A molecular technique was used to explore adult and offspring sex ratios, and also hatching sequences of Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala to potentially provide cooperatively breeding birds with a subtle and precise way of varying investment in the helping sex.
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How fitness is influenced by habitat features within a landscape underlies source-sink concepts and is important to population dynamics and conservation. I relate productivity to habitat quality
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The Noisy Miner was relatively unspecialised in its nest site choice in parks, suggesting that the many suburban parks with branching eucalypts probably provide lots of suitable nest sites for this native honeyeater.
Foraging guild perturbations and ecological homogenization driven by a despotic native bird species.
TLDR
A substantial shift in ecological profile over a broad geographical area as a result of a single native species is demonstrated, potentially affecting plant dispersal and regeneration, insect herbivory and ultimately woodland resilience.
Incidence of competitors and landscape structure as predictors of woodland-dependent birds
TLDR
The landscape-level incidence of the noisy miner was the most important explanatory variable across the assemblage, and complex habitat structure had a consistently positive effect, suggesting in situ restoration of degraded habitats could be a conservation priority.
An empirical test of the mechanistic underpinnings of interference competition
TLDR
An aggressive, overabundant native bird, Manorina melanocephala (noisy miner), whose interference competition is a threatening process for small woodland birds in the highly modified agricultural landscapes of eastern Australia is removed and a doubling in foraging rate is recorded, which appears to confirm the resource availability hypothesis of competition.
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Sex-biased hatching sequences in the cooperatively breeding Noisy Miner
TLDR
A molecular technique was used to explore adult and offspring sex ratios, and also hatching sequences of Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala to potentially provide cooperatively breeding birds with a subtle and precise way of varying investment in the helping sex.
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It is suggested that, in this gregarious species, mobbing behaviour at the nest may be a display of social status or individual quality, and this hypothesis warrants further investigation.
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TLDR
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