Strategies for the biological control of invasive willows (Salix spp.) in Australia.

@article{Adair2006StrategiesFT,
  title={Strategies for the biological control of invasive willows (Salix spp.) in Australia.},
  author={Robin J. Adair and Jean Louis Sagliocco and Eligio Bruzzese},
  journal={Australian Journal of Entomology},
  year={2006},
  volume={45},
  pages={259-267}
}
Willows (Salix spp.) are Weeds of National Significance in Australia where a large number of taxa are naturalised in temperate regions and can cause serious environmental degradation of riparian and wetland habitats. Several species are of economic or ornamental value and conflicts of interest could arise with planning their suppression. Biological control of six willow species (S. alba L., S. cinerea L., S. fragilis L., S. nigra Marshall, S. viminalis L., S. x rubens Schrank) is under… 
Preventing unwanted spread of invasive fungal species in willow (Salix spp.) plantations
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In vitro and in planta bioassays results revealed that potentially pathogenic species belonging to Glomeraceae, Dermateaceae, Diaporthaceae and Venturiaceae may originate from the willow cuttings, which could be transmitted to tree plantations and spread via standard management and coppice practices.
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TLDR
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It is suggested that glyphosate use, in comparable environments, is unlikely to affect aquatic invertebrates, and illustrates invertebrate communities’ resilience to drought events.
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TLDR
Taking into account the ecology of vegetative and generative recruits of floodplain willows, the results indicate that the more vigorous vegetative reproduction capacity can be a crucial property for the success of invasive willow hybrids in Patagonia being a potential threat for S. humboldtiana.
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TLDR
An increase in genotypes can be assumed when male individuals and therefore sexual reproduction would appear in the area around Lake Nuhuel Huapi, which could be a crucial point for the long-term invasion success of the taxa when climatic and other environmental conditions will change in Southern Argentina.
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TLDR
Age structure and growth performances of the dominant four taxa within mixed adult forest stands along the Río Negro, Argentina showed that competition pressure in mature mixed stands could affect S. humboldtiana, however, these stands are usually removed by river dynamics creating new sediment bars and islands.
Invasive Spiraea tomentosa: a new host for monophagous Earias clorana?
TLDR
It is concluded that, in comparison to Salix viminalis, Spiraea tomentosa is not a particularly favourable food for larval development, Perhaps, even without direct improvements in adult foraging efficiency, the costs of switching hosts may be minimised in larvae that develop on very abundant, invasive species, such as Spiraeatomentosa in Central Europe.
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