Strategies for reducing maternal mortality in developing countries: what can we learn from the history of the industrialized West?

@article{Brouwere1998StrategiesFR,
  title={Strategies for reducing maternal mortality in developing countries: what can we learn from the history of the industrialized West?},
  author={V. De Brouwere and R. Tonglet and W. van Lerberghe},
  journal={Tropical Medicine \& International Health},
  year={1998},
  volume={3}
}
Ten years of Safe Motherhood Initiative notwithstanding, many developing countries still experience maternal mortality levels similar to those of industrialized countries in the early 20th century. This paper analyses the conditions under which the industrialized world has reduced maternal mortality over the last 100 years. Preconditions appear to have been early awareness of the magnitude of the problem, recognition that most maternal deaths are avoidable, and mobilization of professionals and… Expand
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