Strategic male signalling effort in a desert-dwelling fish

@article{Wong2008StrategicMS,
  title={Strategic male signalling effort in a desert-dwelling fish},
  author={Bob B. M. Wong and Per Andreas Svensson},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={63},
  pages={543-549}
}
Males often use elaborate courtship displays to attract females for mating. Much attention, in this regard, has been focused on trying to understand the causes and consequences of signal variation among males. Far less, by contrast, is known about within-individual variation in signal expression and, in particular, the extent to which males may be able to strategically adjust their signalling output to try to maximise their reproductive returns. Here, we experimentally investigated male… 

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