Strange vision: ganglion cells as circadian photoreceptors

@article{Berson2003StrangeVG,
  title={Strange vision: ganglion cells as circadian photoreceptors},
  author={D. Berson},
  journal={Trends in Neurosciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={26},
  pages={314-320}
}
  • D. Berson
  • Published 2003
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Trends in Neurosciences
A novel photoreceptor of the mammalian retina has recently been discovered and characterized. The novel cells differ radically from the classical rod and cone photoreceptors. They use a unique photopigment, most probably melanopsin. They have lower sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution than rods or cones and they seem specialized to encode ambient light intensity. Most surprisingly, they are ganglion cells and, thus, communicate directly with the brain. These intrinsically photosensitive… Expand
Phototransduction in ganglion-cell photoreceptors
  • D. Berson
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Pflügers Archiv - European Journal of Physiology
  • 2007
Making (a) sense of non-visual ocular photoreception
Photoreceptor Adaptation in Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells
Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.
Melanopsin and Mechanisms of Non-visual Ocular Photoreception*
Fundamental Retinal Circuitry for Circadian Rhythms
A New Photosensory Function for Simple Photoreceptors, the Intrinsically Photoresponsive Neurons of the Sea Slug Onchidium
The rat retinal ganglion cell in culture: an accessible CNS neurone.
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