Stonehenge

@article{Thom1964Stonehenge,
  title={Stonehenge},
  author={Alexander Strang Thom and Archibald Stevenson Thom and Alexander Strang Thom},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1964},
  volume={203},
  pages={349}
}
Stonehenge, in Wiltshire in the south of England, is in many respects unique among Megalithic remains: most of its stones have been shaped and dressed in a manner which we find in no other stone circle; the large upright menhirs are capped by lintels; the main central part of the monument is an architectural entity carefully designed by an engineer/architect who seems to have had a well-developed sense ofproportion and a sound grasp of the relevant mechanical principles. We must also realise… 

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