Stomagen positively regulates stomatal density in Arabidopsis

@article{Sugano2010StomagenPR,
  title={Stomagen positively regulates stomatal density in Arabidopsis},
  author={Shigeo S Sugano and Tomoo Shimada and Yuki Imai and Katsuya Okawa and Atsushi Tamai and Masashi Mori and Ikuko Hara-Nishimura},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={463},
  pages={241-244}
}
Stomata in the epidermal tissues of leaves are valves through which passes CO2, and as such they influence the global carbon cycle. The two-dimensional pattern and density of stomata in the leaf epidermis are genetically and environmentally regulated to optimize gas exchange. Two putative intercellular signalling factors, EPF1 and EPF2, function as negative regulators of stomatal development in Arabidopsis, possibly by interacting with the receptor-like protein TMM. One or more positive… Expand
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