Stoichiometric and Spectroscopic Study of Reactive Extraction of Phenylacetic Acid with Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate

  • K. K. Athankar
  • Published 2015

Abstract

Phenylacetic acid, also known as benzeneacetic acid (IUPAC Name: 2-phenylacetic acid), is an organic compound containing a phenyl ring and an acidic functional group. It has a white scale-like crystal appearance, and a honey-like odour at low concentration. Phenylacetic acid is used as a precursor in the production of penicillin G (as shown in Fig. 1),1,2 β-lactam, and amphetamine. Due to multifunctional biological and medicinal activities of phenylacetic acid, it is necessary to recover it from the effluent streams. Phenylacetic acid can also be produced by strains of Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and Bacteroides melaninogenicus subspecies isolated from human and animal sources.3 Fermentation technology for the production of carboxylic acids in the form of aqueous solutions has been known in the last few decades. There are various severe inhibiting effects on the rate of conversion and recovery methods from fermentation broths. Several separation techniques such as adsorption4–7, distillation8, electro-dialysis9,10, ion-exchange11, liquid surfactant membrane extraction12,13, liquid-liquid extraction14, precipitation15, reverse osmosis16,17 and ultrafiltration18,19 have been reported in the literature, but all these methods have inherent drawbacks. Calcium hydroxide precipitation has a few shortcomings such as consumption of large quantities of reagents (H2SO4 and lime), a large amount of waste generation per ton of acid produced, waste disposal problems of waste, and very poor sustainability. Dialysis has good potential but its drawbacks involve frequent cleaning requirement, membrane fouling, and a requirement of a larger dialysis unit as compared to a fermenter. Higher power consumption is the main problem with electrodialysis, although it allows simultaneous separation and concentration of the acid. Ion-exchange requires a large amount of chemicals, and generates a large amount of waste. The distillation method is a well-established technology, but its drawbacks involve formation of high-boiling internal esters, dimers, and greater power consumption.20–25 Reactive extraction with the proper selection of diluents and extractants can provide high selectivity and extraction but suffers from toxicity problems of solvents toward microbial strains. Selection of an extractant and diluent for reactive extraction should be on the basis of minimal toxicity and maximum capacity. Stoichiometric and Spectroscopic Study of Reactive Extraction of Phenylacetic Acid with Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Athankar2015StoichiometricAS, title={Stoichiometric and Spectroscopic Study of Reactive Extraction of Phenylacetic Acid with Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate}, author={K. K. Athankar}, year={2015} }