Stochastic processes of soil production and transport: erosion rates, topographic variation and cosmogenic nuclides in the Oregon Coast Range

@article{Heimsath2001StochasticPO,
  title={Stochastic processes of soil production and transport: erosion rates, topographic variation and cosmogenic nuclides in the Oregon Coast Range},
  author={A. M. Heimsath and William E. Dietrich and Kunihiko Nishiizumi and Robert C. Finkel},
  journal={Earth Surface Processes and Landforms},
  year={2001},
  volume={26},
  pages={531-552}
}
Landscapes in areas of active uplift and erosion can only remain soil-mantled if the local production of soil equals or exceeds the local erosion rate. The soil production rate varies with soil depth, hence local variation in soil depth may provide clues about spatial variation in erosion rates. If uplift and the consequent erosion rates are sufficiently uniform in space and time, then there will be tendency toward equilibrium landforms shaped by the erosional processes. Soil mantle thickness… Expand
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