Stochastic processes and host-parasite coevolution: Linking coevolutionary dynamics and DNA polymorphism data

@article{Stephan2020StochasticPA,
  title={Stochastic processes and host-parasite coevolution: Linking coevolutionary dynamics and DNA polymorphism data},
  author={Wolfgang Stephan and Aur{\'e}lien Tellier},
  journal={arXiv: Populations and Evolution},
  year={2020}
}
Between-species coevolution, and in particular antagonistic host-parasite coevolution, is a major process shaping within-species diversity. In this paper we investigate the role of various stochastic processes affecting the outcome of the deterministic coevolutionary models. Specifically, we assess 1) the impact of genetic drift and mutation on the maintenance of polymorphism at the interacting loci, and 2) the change in neutral allele frequencies across the genome of both coevolving species… 

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