Stimulus versus response probability effects in choice reaction time

@article{Biederman1970StimulusVR,
  title={Stimulus versus response probability effects in choice reaction time},
  author={I. Biederman and R. A. Zachary},
  journal={Perception \& Psychophysics},
  year={1970},
  volume={7},
  pages={189-192}
}
The effects of stimulus and response probability on choice reaction time (RT) were independently investigated. In different conditions, two sets of three stimuli of probabilities of.1, .3, .6 and.3, .3, .4 were assigned to two responses-two of the stimuli assigned to one response. All combinations of S-R assignments were studied, yielding response probabilities of .1-.9, ,3-.7, and ,4-.6. With response probability held constant, variations in stimulus probability led to consistent and… Expand

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