Stimulation of Ascospore Release in Venturia inaequalis by Far Red Light

@article{Brook1969StimulationOA,
  title={Stimulation of Ascospore Release in Venturia inaequalis by Far Red Light},
  author={P. Brook},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1969},
  volume={222},
  pages={390-392}
}
Venturia inaequalis (Cke.) Wint, is the fungus which causes “scab” disease of apple. Its perithecia develop in fallen apple leaves late in winter, and ascospores mature during spring. Various workers, for example, Hirst and Stedman1, have established that the ascospores are not released unless the leaves are wetted. I have found that greater numbers of ascospores are released when the wetted apple leaves are in the light than when they are in darkness2. Results reported here are from an… Expand
EFFECT OF LIGHT ON ASCOSPORE DISCHARGE BY FIVE FUNGI WITH BITUNICATE ASCI
TLDR
Experiments on ascospore discharge from naturally developed perithecia were conducted in a wind tunnel and it is postulated that in these bitunicate fungi a photoreaction is involved in the rupture of the exoascus tip. Expand
Seasonal pattern of maturation of Venturia inaequalis ascospores in New Zealand
Abstract Overwintered apple leaves infected by Venturia inaequalis (Cke.) Wint. were held outdoors and tested repeatedly during spring for production of ascospores. In each test leaves were placed inExpand
Discharge and Dissemination of Ascospores by Venturia inaequalis During Dew.
TLDR
This is the first confirmed report of relatively large (>10% of the season's total inoculum) numbers of airborne ascospores in orchards during dew. Expand
Sporulation ofPestalotia palmarum Cooke in culture
TLDR
The fungusPestalotia palmarum Cooke required light for formation of acervuli in culture and fruiting was similar under blue, green, yellow and red filters. Expand
Ascospore release in apple scab underlies infrared sensation.
TLDR
It is proved that infrared radiation induces V. inaequalis to release its spores, the first report in which spore discharge could be stimulated during night under field conditions, to investigate the causes of diurnal rhythm of ascospore dissemination of the apple scab fungus. Expand
Ascospore discharge in Pleospora herbarum (Pers.) Rabenh. (Dothideales) stimulated by near-ultraviolet radiation
TLDR
An isolate of P. herbarum from beet seed failed to discharge ascospores in darkness but did so when exposed to light either continuously or cyclically (12 h light/12 h dark) and when light of different wavelengths (300 nm-infrared) was tested, only near-ultraviolet radiation stimulated ascospore discharge. Expand
Influence of Light, Relative Humidity, and Maturity of Populations on Discharge of Ascospores of Venturia inaequalis.
ABSTRACT Ascospore release in 20 populations of Venturia inaequalis was generally suppressed in wind tunnel tests during darkness and simulated rain, but the following relieved this suppression: (i)Expand
Discharge of Venturia inaequalis ascospores during daytime and nighttime wetting periods in Ontario and Nova Scotia
TLDR
Discharge of Venturia inaequalis ascospores during daytime and nighttime wetting periods in Ontario and Nova Scotia in 1992 is reported. Expand
Factors Affecting the Release of Ascospores of Anisogramma anomala.
TLDR
Monitoring seasonal precipitation patterns may be useful for estimating the quantity and temporal distribution of airborne inoculum during the period that the host is susceptible to infection. Expand
Environmental Factors Affecting the Release and Dispersal of Ascospores of Mycosphaerella citri.
TLDR
Greasy spot, caused by Mycosphaerella citri, produces a leaf spot disease affecting all citrus species in Florida and the Caribbean Basin, and can be advanced by irrigating frequently during dry, nonconducive conditions to stimulate ascospore release when environmental conditions are unfavorable for infection. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES
The epidemiology of apple scab (Venturia inaequalis (Cke.) Wint.)
TLDR
Observations of the release when atmospheric turbulence was constant or slight suggested that the smaller liberation at night could result from the interaction between temperature and the time for maturation since the previous wetting, which allows new methods to be introduced for studying ascospore discharge by Venturia and other fungi. Expand
The Physiology of Phytochrome