Stillbirths: economic and psychosocial consequences

@article{Heazell2016StillbirthsEA,
  title={Stillbirths: economic and psychosocial consequences},
  author={A. Heazell and D. Siassakos and H. Blencowe and C. Burden and Z. Bhutta and J. Cacciatore and Nghia C Dang and Jai K Das and V. Flenady and K. Gold and Olivia K Mensah and J. Millum and D. Nuzum and K. O'Donoghue and M. Redshaw and A. Rizvi and Tracy Roberts and H. Saraki and C. Storey and A. Wojcieszek and S. Downe and J. Fr{\o}en and M. Kinney and L. Bernis and J. Lawn and S. Leisher and I. R{\aa}destad and L. Jackson and Chidubem B Ogwulu and Alison Hills and Stephanie A Bradley and W. Taylor and J. Budd},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2016},
  volume={387},
  pages={604-616}
}
Despite the frequency of stillbirths, the subsequent implications are overlooked and underappreciated. We present findings from comprehensive, systematic literature reviews, and new analyses of published and unpublished data, to establish the effect of stillbirth on parents, families, health-care providers, and societies worldwide. Data for direct costs of this event are sparse but suggest that a stillbirth needs more resources than a livebirth, both in the perinatal period and in additional… Expand
The Multiple Impact of Stillbirth on Families : a Review of Recent Literature Exploring the Psychological Social and Economic Ramifications of Losing a Baby
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The experience of stillbirth
  • F. Alderdice
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of reproductive and infant psychology
  • 2017
TLDR
The role of psychology is not only evident because of the support needed for the estimated 4.2 million women who are living with depression associated with previous stillbirth but also because even a brief overview shows many opportunities for psychosocial intervention. Expand
Care following stillbirth in high-resource settings: Latest evidence, guidelines, and best practice points.
TLDR
The latest published research, guidelines, and best practice points from high-income countries will be used and will highlight the gaps in the research which urgently need to be addressed. Expand
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TLDR
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Interventions for investigating and identifying the causes of stillbirth.
TLDR
There is currently a lack of RCT evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions for investigating and identifying the causes of stillbirth, but it remains unclear what impact these interventions have on the psychosocial outcomes of parents and families, the rates of diagnosis of the causes, and the care and management of subsequent pregnancies following stillbirth. Expand
Addressing Stillbirth in India Must Include Men
ABSTRACT Background: Millennium Development Goal 4, to reduce child mortality, can only be achieved by reducing stillbirths globally. A confluence of medical and sociocultural factors contribute toExpand
No. 369-Management of Pregnancy Subsequent to Stillbirth.
TLDR
This guideline presents a summary of the literature and a general consensus on the management of pregnancies subsequent to stillbirth and perinatal loss and describes a multidisciplinary approach in the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care to women and families with a history of stillbirth. Expand
Pregnancy subsequent to stillbirth: Medical and psychosocial aspects of care.
TLDR
There is an urgent need for global leadership and research to address knowledge gaps about the pervasive impact of stillbirth and the lack of existing evidence to guide care. Expand
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The narrative review of the quantitative studies revealed a higher level of anxiety and depression in couples with stillbirth compared to those without stillbirth and a range of psychological effects common to families that have experienced stillbirth. Expand
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