Still(ed) Lives

@article{Stabile2010StilledL,
  title={Still(ed) Lives},
  author={Susan M. Stabile},
  journal={Early American Literature},
  year={2010},
  volume={45},
  pages={371 - 395}
}
One early morning in 1840, a group of bewildered villagers stood on the shore of the Merrimack River watching a canal boat from Boston arrive at the Lowell storehouse wharf. Besides the wild menagerie of stuffed lions, tigers, camels, and snakes, the boat “had on board quite a number of passengers, among them Miss Charlotte Temple [and] Miss Eliza Wharton, of Reading. . . . These ladies were not in the flesh, to be sure, but in a very good quality of wax, and although great pains were taken by… Expand

References

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Uncle Tom's Cabin as Visual Culture
Interpreting Objects and Collections
among others, argues that domestic fiction worked as a tool for control of others—the subjugation of different classes and races. See Tender Violence: Domestic Visions in an Age of U.S
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motor” that drives narrative plot in Freudian psychology’s pleasure principle and death drive in “Narrative Desire,
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salvage ethnography” was coined by anthropologist Jacob Gruber in his critique of colonialism informing nineteenth- century Still(ed) Lives
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