Stepwise acquisition of vocal combinatorial capacity in songbirds and human infants

@article{Lipkind2013StepwiseAO,
  title={Stepwise acquisition of vocal combinatorial capacity in songbirds and human infants},
  author={Dina Lipkind and Gary F. Marcus and Douglas Knox Bemis and Kazutoshi Sasahara and Nori Jacoby and Miki Takahashi and Kenta Suzuki and Olga Feher and Primoz Ravbar and Kazuo Okanoya and Ofer Tchernichovski},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2013},
  volume={498},
  pages={104 - 108}
}
Human language, as well as birdsong, relies on the ability to arrange vocal elements in new sequences. However, little is known about the ontogenetic origin of this capacity. Here we track the development of vocal combinatorial capacity in three species of vocal learners, combining an experimental approach in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) with an analysis of natural development of vocal transitions in Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata domestica) and pre-lingual human infants. We find a… Expand
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